The G-Spot and Female Ejaculation

What Is It?

The G-spot is the common name for the paraurethral sponge, an area of spongy tissue surrounding the urethra, which some women love to have stimulated. All women have a G-spot, but not all women respond to G-Spot stimulation in the same way. The G-spot is located just behind the front wall of the vagina (towards the belly), about two inches inside.

Where Is It?

To find your G-spot, insert a curved finger, or two, towards your belly. Move them in a "come hither" motion. Does the pressure feel more intense in one area than in others? If your fingers are too short to reach, try a curved sex toy. The more turned on you are, the more likely you are to notice a different texture of the wall, and a different sensation when you press the spot. The texture of the G-spot, felt through the vaginal wall, can be somewhat bumpy and not as smooth as other areas of the vaginal wall.  Doing regular Kegel exercises can lead to enhanced G-spot sensations.

Getting a Rise Out of It

The G-Spot responds to pressure, so forgo the light pet and go for firm stimulation. To explore G-spot stimulation use something curved for penetration. Fingers work very well, but there are toys such as the Crystal Wand, Babeland Nubby G Vibe, and the G-Spotter attachments for the Hitachi Magic Wand and the Wahl, designed specifically for G-spot stimulation. Curved dildos are more likely to hit the spot if you are using a harness.

G-Spots and Partner Sex

Doggy-style positions, with the upper body slightly raised (for example, hands supported on the wall), are well suited for G-spot stimulation with straighter dildos or male partners. The woman-on-top position also gives the receptive partner more control over the stimulation--by leaning back slightly she can adjust her position so the dildo or penis hits her G-spot. For more tips on G-spot friendly positions, check out Tristan Taormino's Expert Guide to Positions DVD.

Female Ejaculate

The very exciting thing that happens for some women during G-Spot stimulation is that they ejaculate. This can be a pretty surprising event for people if they don't expect it or don't know what it is. The ejaculate comes out of the Skene's glands that open up into the urethra. Ejaculate is generally clear but may be somewhat milky, and the amount is typically not more than a teaspoon or two. If you're afraid of "peeing the bed," rest assured that ejaculate is not urine. If you are concerned about this, try emptying your bladder before sex, then you may feel more comfortable letting yourself go. For more technical info on the G-spot, read the book, The Good Vibrations Guide to the G-Spot, one of our favorite sex books ever.

© 2004 Toys in Babeland (Babeland.com)