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Babeland Toy Store
Customer Service: (888) 289-8423
Customer Service: (888) 289-8423
Cory Silverberg over at About.com has done it again and written an amazing article that made me think and will help me do my job better. Cory worked at a sex toy store that was very conscious of the intersections between sexuality and disability issues. Because of this, Cory says, a lot of people came to this business to find out more about "sex toys for disabled people". Cory right points out, however that...
...while it makes sense to talk about accessible sex toys, there's no such thing as sex toys for disabled people. People who have the lived experience of disability are no more alike than people who live in Dayton, Ohio. Can you imagine special sex toys for Daytonites (is that what they call themselves)? The idea of there being sex toys for disabled people assumes that all disabled people are the same, or at least are looking for the same thing in a sex toy.
Cory continues to discuss this even more thoroughly, which really helped me gain an understanding on the difference between thinking of "toys for disabled people" versus "toys that are accessible for more people". It may not seem like much, but it's a critical difference.Cory then provides a fantastic checklist of things to consider when buying a toy for increased accessibility. On this list are:Who is the sex toy for?Can you tell what is happening in your body?Mobility and motor controlFatigue.... and many more. Check out the full list - I promise you'll learn a lot. To drive Cory's point home, I would venture to guess that there are many folks out there who would not consider themselves to be disabled but who will find questions on this checklist to be very helpful. It's all about finding the right toys, not fitting certain toys into a category.For more information, check out Cory's book, The Ultimate Guide to Sex and Disability