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New Image.PNG�� Inspired by the upcoming Sexy Mama events at our stores in celebration of Mother?s Day, we?re banding together our favorite Sexy Mama bloggers to write about their sex-positive parenting experiences through the month of May.� Each week has a new theme and new spin from each writer.

Sex Positive Families ? what does it mean, and how do you create this in a rather sex-negative culture? How do you model being a sex-positive mom?

Sex positive parenting is a method of raising children so that they are not ashamed or uncomfortable with their others or their own sexuality. It teaches acceptance and openness to all people. I feel that this takes many shapes, for me it means exposing my children to many forms of sexuality and gender from an early age, being comfortable with my body in front of them (no matter how I really feel about it), projecting a positive body image helps them and I to believe that the female form is beautiful regardless of what advertisements tell us.

I try to be open and honest with my son but, there are so many stories of adults seeking therapy because their parents were too open with them as children. This leads me to often wonder to myself if whether I am doing more harm then good. What is a healthy balance of sexuality with a small child? My son is five years old and will be going into first grade this fall. He comes home and tells me proudly about he and his friends showing off their penises in the bathroom or that he was talking about sex with his friend (don?t worry mom, the teacher didn?t hear), and all I can respond with is, ?That behavior is not really appropriate at school. What if another child?s parent doesn?t want them talking about sex? Our society tends to be frightened of children?s sexuality, even though it is harmless.? He knows that at home he can have that freedom to show off his penis and ask about sex, but talking about it with mom isn?t really as cool as bragging to the kids at school.

Not to mention that he is an inquisitive little gent and these answers often lead into more questions. I try to answer them, but feel like I am blaming society. Not to say that our society is innocent, but there is a level of responsibility that needs to be taken on by me. I know that as a parent all I want is for my son to grow up and be proud of whoever he is and to know that no matter what I will be proud and supportive as well.

Then society comes in and hands us all a dose of reality. I know that he will have struggles, he already does. He battles the other kids picking on him because he likes to wear suits and ties to school, and sometimes wears hello kitty socks. This is normal to him, but to the other kids he is weird. I have to just remind him that as long as he is happy with how he looks and is proud of who he is it doesn?t matter what the other kids think. Deep down, though, I remember how it felt to want that acceptance, and I lost a part of me that I struggle to get back.

This is supposed to be about modeling sex positivity, and to me that is based largely on the ability to look in the mirror everyday and say I like what I see and it doesn?t matter who or what the magazine stands say. The best way I can help my son reach this goal is to help him feel that positive with himself, and to understand and celebrate the many different people that make up our society.