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poster1The Wisconsin Badger-Herald reports that a group of law students at the University of Wisconsin Law School tried to bring a sex-positive sex toy party to campus. From what I understand, not only were they going to talk about sex toys and sexual health and pleasure but they were also going to talk about state laws concerning sex toys. You know, law student stuff.It turns out that Wisconsin Law School has a policy against student groups "selling, promoting or endorsing commercial products". Using this policy as justification, the dean of the school, Dean Walter Dickey (yes, Dickey, really) canceled the event just hours beforehand. When informed by the students that their event contained no selling, promoting or endorsing of commercial products, just talking generally about sex toys, he refused to let it continue saying, according to students, that there would be no sex toys on the law school campus. In a particularly Dick(ey)'ish move, the dean informed the students about the cancelation by posting a note on the door of the room where the event was supposed to be that said ?The event that was scheduled in this room at 3 p.m. is canceled. ? Walter Dickey.? It is just me or is that just about as awful as breaking up with someone via text message?poster2A First Amendment attorney and a professor at Barry University School of Law thinks using this policy was a cover up and that the real problem was the posters. Whether it was Dean Dickey who was offended by the very cute posters (pictured) or even just one other student, it's ironic that a law school would be prohibiting free speech in such a way - you'd think they would know their first amendment law better than anyone.What it really all seems to boil down to is a fear of talking about sex or even being part of an institution that supports others talking about sex. This isn't the first time students have had trouble bringing sex positive educators to campus. The administrators always use policies and other excuses but really, they're uncomfortable and they won't (or can't) see the importance of these topics in people's lives and so they assume that it must be an extravagance that students don't really need. Considering the fact that they're in an academic environment where most students could benefit from a few more orgasms to relieve stress and get through finals, I think it should be part of the student wellness programs. Maybe one day we'll get there but until people can learn to be more comfortable talking about sex openly (or even seeing a poster with a dildo on it), we'll never get there. I hope the students at Wisconsin eventually get to hold their event but I can promise Dean Dickey that it won't be as bad as he thinks it will be. Maybe he should attend - he might learn something new.